Monday, January 30, 2012

The Reading Pile



It took me months to read this book, mainly because I knew that Dietrich Bonhoeffer dies at the end.  It  has been years since a book has caused me to cry as hard as this book did.  What a gentleman Bonhoeffer was.  What a brilliant, astute, kind and intellectually honest man he was.  He was true to the end.

From the morning of Bonhoeffer's death:

(from the prison camp doctor) 
"'Through the half-open door in one room of the huts I saw Pastor Bonhoeffer, before taking off his prison garb, kneeling on the floor praying fervently to his God.  I was most deeply moved by the way this lovable man prayed, so devout and so certain that God heard his prayer.  At the place of execution, he again said a short prayer and then climbed the steps to the gallows, brave and composed.  His death ensued after a few seconds.  In the almost fifty years that I have worked as a doctor, I have hardly ever seen a man die so entirely submissive to the will of God.'

Bonhoeffer thought it the plain duty of the Christian - and the privilege and honor - to suffer with those who suffered.  He knew that it was a privilege to be allowed by God to partake of the sufferings of the Jews who had died in this place before him."



 


"Life is difficult."

This is a re-read, but it may take me months to get past the first sentence.  It is packed with wisdom that I have lost and am ready to find again.


 


I love Nouwen.  I love that he was moved to deeper spiritual growth by viewing a painting.  I love his hunger for righteousness that is exhibited in honesty and a desire to love more truly.

"I am the prodigal son every time I search for unconditional love where it cannot be found.  Why do I keep ignoring the place of true love and persist in looking for it elsewhere?  Why do I keep leaving home where I am called a child of God, the Beloved of my Father?  I am constantly surprised at how I keep taking the gifts god has given me - my health, my intellectual and emotional gifts - and keep using them to impress people, receive affirmation and praise, and compete for rewards, instead of developing them for the glory of God."







There is always a mystery story in my pile.  And P.D. James is the best.

6 comments:

Alison said...

Love seeing a glimpse of what's on your bedside table. I'm reading "Man Seeks God," and I just finished the latest Elizabeth George. I think George and James are two of the best writing mysteries...They are really novels with mysteries in them.

At A Hen's Pace said...

Glad you are back, Diane! I have read and enjoyed all but the first one on your reading pile. Did I ever tell you how much I enjoyed The Apprentice, by Jacques Pepin? I am glad you recommended the audio version--I enjoyed the reader so much!

Happy New Year's--

Jeanne

Carol in Oregon said...

Ha HA! Jeanne, I got the audio version of The Apprentice because of Di's recommendation too. We're practically twins!

Have you read Josephine Tey, Di? I read one last year, and Sherry at Semicolon listed a Tey title as one of her favorite books ever.

I have some time to listen to Bonhoeffer this afternoon. I want to hear (again) his letter of condolence. "Where God tears great gaps, we should not try to fill them with human words." That may be my favorite quote of 2012.

I love your list.

A Circle of Quiet said...

Oh, I love the Apprentice. I have fond memories of driving to Oregon listening to it!

Carol, I just found a Josephine Tey book on the for sale table at the library. I have had her recommended for years, but I have never read her. I'll let you know what I think.

That Bonhoeffer quote has been such a consolation to me. Along with the hundreds of other things I underlined, circled, and otherwise marked up in that book. Poor John will have a hard time finding Metaxas's words with all of my markings.

Di

A Circle of Quiet said...

Alison, I have not read much Elizabeth George. What do you recommend?

Di

stephseef said...

It's the final chapter that moved me to inconsolable sobs.. the one about his parents, and the broadcast. Sob. I'm so glad you're back, Di. Sure do love you.